I’d love to be able to ask

October 26, 2005 at 7:19 PM (Able Bodied Antics, Assumptions) (, )

this question in real life polite company, but I doubt I could ever work up the nerve.

Is there a conspiracy amongst the able-bodied?

Or have they been programmed?

To walk past *three or four* empty regular restroom stalls to make a beeline for the accessible facilities?

So that when one of us needs to use them, they are always in use by the able, with *three or four empty regular stalls* that are about as useful to us as say…well…NOTHING?

I slammed myself into an able stall today and was *fifteen minutes* getting out of the damned thing. Thank Deity my workday had concluded.

It’s the same programming that makes them insolent and sometimes downright nasty about taking up accessible parking places.

It’s also related to the great wail of martyrdom that is heard when a lift helping to transport a disabled customer breaks down in miduse, leaving not only that customer, but all the abled’s delayed on their transit ride as they wait for another bus…oh, the gnashing of teeth. I remember one fellow on a bus one day with me when someone was using a scooter and got lifted on and then the lift stopped listening, and they called another bus.

“Why can’t they wait and do their transport later in the day?…We’ve got *real* *important* places to go!”

He was six one and pissed off.

All of my five foot three inches didn’t give a shit.

I said, “Excuse me sir, but where do you get off *knowing* that where she’s going isn’t as important as where you’re going?!!! ” She could have a job, just like you, and be facing the same delay. If it’s a medical appointment, or personal business, no one would bitch at *you* for taking the bus, now would they? No matter which time you took it.”

It’s a conspiracy, I tell ya. All of it. Where’s my tinfoil hat?

16 Comments

  1. Suzy said,

    Good for you for speakin’ up. I would have done the same. People just annoy me sometimes at how insensitive they are, and it ain’t gettin’ any better.

    Hope you are well

  2. Suzy said,

    Good for you for speakin’ up. I would have done the same. People just annoy me sometimes at how insensitive they are, and it ain’t gettin’ any better.

    Hope you are well

  3. The Angry Gimp said,

    Glad you spoke up – what a jackass! He should be thanking his lucky stars that he can walk instead of bitching about a lift delaying his ride. Oh well. That’s life, pal.

  4. The Angry Gimp said,

    Glad you spoke up – what a jackass! He should be thanking his lucky stars that he can walk instead of bitching about a lift delaying his ride. Oh well. That’s life, pal.

  5. Gimpy Mumpy said,

    Good for you for saying something! I hate it when they stare and roll their eyes to one another when I ‘take too long’. Why dont’ they understand that this just makes me intentionally go slower? 😛

  6. Gimpy Mumpy said,

    Good for you for saying something! I hate it when they stare and roll their eyes to one another when I ‘take too long’. Why dont’ they understand that this just makes me intentionally go slower? 😛

  7. The Goldfish said,

    There was a thing in one of our papers (not available on-line) where the Chief of Police of a particular county reckoned that 90% of people who parked illegally in a disabled bay had a pre-existing criminal record.

    I thought this was kind of comforting, the idea that these people are in their own minority subclass of folks who just don’t exercise consideration for others.

    I mean to say, it’s more comforting that the idea that no non-disabled people care one bit. In fact I have always thought that it is only a minority of people who disregard us and they’re probably the types who have little respect for anyone…

  8. The Goldfish said,

    There was a thing in one of our papers (not available on-line) where the Chief of Police of a particular county reckoned that 90% of people who parked illegally in a disabled bay had a pre-existing criminal record.

    I thought this was kind of comforting, the idea that these people are in their own minority subclass of folks who just don’t exercise consideration for others.

    I mean to say, it’s more comforting that the idea that no non-disabled people care one bit. In fact I have always thought that it is only a minority of people who disregard us and they’re probably the types who have little respect for anyone…

  9. bridgett said,

    I’m not exactly polite, and I’m more union than company…but it’s true. The currently abled, recognizing that they’re soon going to be disabled through the ordinary operations of aging and debility, have decided to accept their future with grace and without fuss by hogging up facilities we don’t currently need. Never too early to begin adapting….

    But seriously, I blame the trend in American homes towards huge “three TVs and a roadmap” bathrooms. As American butts get larger, the relative distance between said butt and bathroom stall wall shrinks. For some, it’s getting a little snug and the accessible bathrooms feel more proportionally comfortable. I also cop to moving
    my kid into the stall with me when we’re in an unfamiliar location; two people can fit easily in one of the accessible stalls, but a child basically has to be in one’s lap in a regular stall. Maybe the tie-up in the workplace has something to do with the stereotypical phenomenon of women going to the bathroom in multiple numbers…but I suspect that in restaurants and museums, it’s the kid issue that’s more salient. I’ve noted that many of these accessible restroom stalls in restaurants double as “motherports” where one can diaper a kid without laying the tyke on a pee-soaked floor. Just another way that motherhood is treated as a disabling condition. Anyhow, that’s a major source of competition for the physically challenged woman looking to pee.

  10. bridgett said,

    I’m not exactly polite, and I’m more union than company…but it’s true. The currently abled, recognizing that they’re soon going to be disabled through the ordinary operations of aging and debility, have decided to accept their future with grace and without fuss by hogging up facilities we don’t currently need. Never too early to begin adapting….

    But seriously, I blame the trend in American homes towards huge “three TVs and a roadmap” bathrooms. As American butts get larger, the relative distance between said butt and bathroom stall wall shrinks. For some, it’s getting a little snug and the accessible bathrooms feel more proportionally comfortable. I also cop to moving
    my kid into the stall with me when we’re in an unfamiliar location; two people can fit easily in one of the accessible stalls, but a child basically has to be in one’s lap in a regular stall. Maybe the tie-up in the workplace has something to do with the stereotypical phenomenon of women going to the bathroom in multiple numbers…but I suspect that in restaurants and museums, it’s the kid issue that’s more salient. I’ve noted that many of these accessible restroom stalls in restaurants double as “motherports” where one can diaper a kid without laying the tyke on a pee-soaked floor. Just another way that motherhood is treated as a disabling condition. Anyhow, that’s a major source of competition for the physically challenged woman looking to pee.

  11. Katja said,

    Why does everyone want to use the large stall? Because it’s easier and more comfortable, that’s why.

    Which just points out the idiocy of segregation of bathroom stalls. If all the stalls were accessible, everyone could have an accessible stall!

  12. Katja said,

    Why does everyone want to use the large stall? Because it’s easier and more comfortable, that’s why.

    Which just points out the idiocy of segregation of bathroom stalls. If all the stalls were accessible, everyone could have an accessible stall!

  13. Cyn said,

    There are some of us who have invisible disabilities, who need those rails to safely get up and down.

    Before I needed them, I avoided the accessible stalls, in case someone who did need them came along – even if I had to wait a bit for another stall. I’d much rather not need them now than have the “privilege” of some “right” to use them.

  14. Cyn said,

    There are some of us who have invisible disabilities, who need those rails to safely get up and down.

    Before I needed them, I avoided the accessible stalls, in case someone who did need them came along – even if I had to wait a bit for another stall. I’d much rather not need them now than have the “privilege” of some “right” to use them.

  15. Eliza said,

    It never ceases to amaze me how people STARE at the person who is getting on or off the bus lift. Like it’s a freakin’ free puppet show or something. Because, gosh, when you KNOW that the entire bus is having to wait longer because the whole set up of the ramp and the seats takes awhile, you might not feel awkward enough. Everyone should stop and stare, especially in NY where no one will ever make eye contact with someone who’s NOT disabled.

    I did have a really funny with a bus driver regarding this, though. The bus wasn’t too crowded, but there were a few people on it who were visibly and audibly annoyed by the Extreme Inconvenience of having to wait for someone to exit the bus in a wheelchair a few stops before I got off. I gave them a few choice words, and the bus driver told them to shut up.

    When we got to my stop, I went to get off, and the driver said, “We can use the lift for you, you know.” (I walk with a cane but do not regularly use a chair, so I can do the couple of steps up to the bus). “Oh, no, I’m fine, thanks” I told him. He looks at me, grinning, and says, “PLEASE?! I want to make it take as long as possible just to piss off those assholes who are in such a rush to get home a little more.” Heee. I love when the bus drivers get it!

  16. Eliza said,

    It never ceases to amaze me how people STARE at the person who is getting on or off the bus lift. Like it’s a freakin’ free puppet show or something. Because, gosh, when you KNOW that the entire bus is having to wait longer because the whole set up of the ramp and the seats takes awhile, you might not feel awkward enough. Everyone should stop and stare, especially in NY where no one will ever make eye contact with someone who’s NOT disabled.

    I did have a really funny with a bus driver regarding this, though. The bus wasn’t too crowded, but there were a few people on it who were visibly and audibly annoyed by the Extreme Inconvenience of having to wait for someone to exit the bus in a wheelchair a few stops before I got off. I gave them a few choice words, and the bus driver told them to shut up.

    When we got to my stop, I went to get off, and the driver said, “We can use the lift for you, you know.” (I walk with a cane but do not regularly use a chair, so I can do the couple of steps up to the bus). “Oh, no, I’m fine, thanks” I told him. He looks at me, grinning, and says, “PLEASE?! I want to make it take as long as possible just to piss off those assholes who are in such a rush to get home a little more.” Heee. I love when the bus drivers get it!

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