Some things are just…

September 27, 2005 at 8:17 PM (Employment) ()

awful…Over at No Pity a chef who should stick with cooking and let someone else do the interviewing.

Theres also some truthful discussion about “What happens if one disabled person does something “wrong,” ?”and the rest of the group is then viewed through the lens of that person’s mistake.

It makes for difficult job interviewing and retention.

6 Comments

  1. Gimpy Mumpy said,

    I read some of this discussion thread too and really felt that it points out an even more general aspect of human nature. We are judgemental of others and we often then try to justify this by being even more judgemental.
    I have seen this in an office setting full of other women. If the ‘beautiful’ one in the group get the promotion, then the rest go on about how it was only because of her looks. If the ‘crip’ or ‘ugly duckling’ gets it, then they must be filling some sort of quota. I think this boils down to (in this situation) not dealing with the anxiety, jealousy and feeling of rejection that the others (who didn’t get the promotion) feel. If people came out and said what they really felt, then we could solve so many of these problems.
    Just a thought, sorry to ramble on so!

  2. Gimpy Mumpy said,

    I read some of this discussion thread too and really felt that it points out an even more general aspect of human nature. We are judgemental of others and we often then try to justify this by being even more judgemental.
    I have seen this in an office setting full of other women. If the ‘beautiful’ one in the group get the promotion, then the rest go on about how it was only because of her looks. If the ‘crip’ or ‘ugly duckling’ gets it, then they must be filling some sort of quota. I think this boils down to (in this situation) not dealing with the anxiety, jealousy and feeling of rejection that the others (who didn’t get the promotion) feel. If people came out and said what they really felt, then we could solve so many of these problems.
    Just a thought, sorry to ramble on so!

  3. bridgett said,

    The “we tried one of those people once and it didn’t work…” Ah yes. This used to happen a lot in the academic world in departments with an older entrenched male faculty. (It still happens. Who am I kidding? Maybe less? I hope?) A lone woman is hired. Perhaps she’s shut out of the old-boy network of sociability because she doesn’t drink scotch or play golf. She lacks mentors. She’s expected to sit on every committee so that the department can show its commitment to diversity. She is expected to mentor every female graduate and undergraduate student in the place. She’s expected to entertain gracefully and often. She’s never told that teaching doesn’t count as much as research — instead, she has more classroom visits than anyone else, because her peers “want to see how she’s doing.” She doesn’t know how to get research money or time off and lacking insider information, she misses opportunities for professional development. She’s undercompensated “until she earns her stripes”. And she fails tenure because she’s been stretched in fifty thousand directions with no support, no guidance, and no money. On the search to replace her, the consensus around the table is that women don’t work out.

    The whole “if one person screws up, that makes the rest of us look bad” thing is nothing more than buying into some pernicious self-justification among the abled for their bigoted behavior. But it does point out a tension inherent in the disability/crip rights movement as a whole. On the one hand, there’s an “us” — persons who identify as disabled and who share a certain set of experiences and cultural outlooks that are in part an outgrowth of their experiences. On the other, there is no “us” — there is a militant and necessary insistence on being respectfully treated as an individual, one human among billions of humans all of whom are blessedly different. So, on the one hand, the “community” is constructed in conjunction with (and sometimes in opposition to) the abled — and are making arguments for a collective privileged status. On the other, there’s a powerful demand for a radically expanded notion of human rights. Are these positions antithetical or are they interdependent? Which one do the readers here privilege in their own experiences and politics?

    I guess I’m just puzzling all this out in my head and maybe someone can point me toward some theory writers who have thought through the policy and advocacy aspects of this. Anyhow, I thought it worth bringing up and maybe talking about.

  4. bridgett said,

    The “we tried one of those people once and it didn’t work…” Ah yes. This used to happen a lot in the academic world in departments with an older entrenched male faculty. (It still happens. Who am I kidding? Maybe less? I hope?) A lone woman is hired. Perhaps she’s shut out of the old-boy network of sociability because she doesn’t drink scotch or play golf. She lacks mentors. She’s expected to sit on every committee so that the department can show its commitment to diversity. She is expected to mentor every female graduate and undergraduate student in the place. She’s expected to entertain gracefully and often. She’s never told that teaching doesn’t count as much as research — instead, she has more classroom visits than anyone else, because her peers “want to see how she’s doing.” She doesn’t know how to get research money or time off and lacking insider information, she misses opportunities for professional development. She’s undercompensated “until she earns her stripes”. And she fails tenure because she’s been stretched in fifty thousand directions with no support, no guidance, and no money. On the search to replace her, the consensus around the table is that women don’t work out.

    The whole “if one person screws up, that makes the rest of us look bad” thing is nothing more than buying into some pernicious self-justification among the abled for their bigoted behavior. But it does point out a tension inherent in the disability/crip rights movement as a whole. On the one hand, there’s an “us” — persons who identify as disabled and who share a certain set of experiences and cultural outlooks that are in part an outgrowth of their experiences. On the other, there is no “us” — there is a militant and necessary insistence on being respectfully treated as an individual, one human among billions of humans all of whom are blessedly different. So, on the one hand, the “community” is constructed in conjunction with (and sometimes in opposition to) the abled — and are making arguments for a collective privileged status. On the other, there’s a powerful demand for a radically expanded notion of human rights. Are these positions antithetical or are they interdependent? Which one do the readers here privilege in their own experiences and politics?

    I guess I’m just puzzling all this out in my head and maybe someone can point me toward some theory writers who have thought through the policy and advocacy aspects of this. Anyhow, I thought it worth bringing up and maybe talking about.

  5. imfunnytoo said,

    First, a personal anecdote and then more about *the big picture* you’ve both brought up. When I worked for True Loss insurance, my first cubemate loathed me on sight. No reason that I could figure out, although later it turned out she had a disabled friend who would use her and ask for money all the time, and I said *aha.*

    And now as I go back into the job market I’m fighting a perception of unreliability (I’m on medicine now that means I’m NOT, but no way to show or prove that.)

    The big picture:

    It’s both fear of the unknown (us) and individual ables insecurity about their own issues I’m also concered about the ‘supercrip’ problem. Does ‘doing it right’ mean we all have to buy into that stereotype? Because that seems a bit dangerous to me.

  6. imfunnytoo said,

    First, a personal anecdote and then more about *the big picture* you’ve both brought up. When I worked for True Loss insurance, my first cubemate loathed me on sight. No reason that I could figure out, although later it turned out she had a disabled friend who would use her and ask for money all the time, and I said *aha.*

    And now as I go back into the job market I’m fighting a perception of unreliability (I’m on medicine now that means I’m NOT, but no way to show or prove that.)

    The big picture:

    It’s both fear of the unknown (us) and individual ables insecurity about their own issues I’m also concered about the ‘supercrip’ problem. Does ‘doing it right’ mean we all have to buy into that stereotype? Because that seems a bit dangerous to me.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: